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Friday, April 11, 2008

Mahi-Mahi Maui Style



Mahi-mahi is known as common dolphin-fish, dorado maverikos, or lampuki (in Maltese) are surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shore tropical and subtropical waters worldwide.  The name and the weird look of the fish (like a neon green colored dolphin) was more of a stunner when I first learned of the fish instead of wondering what it tastes like.  Since mahi-mahi is a tropical fish and is commonly eaten in Hawaii, I thought some Asian inspired Hawaiian recipe will go well with this – basically with soy sauce and butter.  I did actually grow up eating occasional steamed rice with soy sauce and butter.  This dish shares that flavor plus citrous lemony flavor.

1. First, heat butter on your pan.



2. Add minced garlic. Once it's cooked, turn the heat off and remove the pan from the stove.

3. Once removed from the heat, add some lemon juice or fresh lemon sqeeze, teriyaki sauce, honey, and ginger powder to the sauce. This concoction will be the marinade for the fish.



4. Now you need to put a fillet of Mahi Mahi in a container and sprinkle some salt and pepper before pouring your marinade prepared from above steps.

5. Put this in the refrigerator for about 2 hours.

6. Now you prepare some vegetables for garnish.  Instead of having some complex carbohydrates to go with your entree, fish and vegetables will be a very healthy meal.

For the mushrooms, I took the cap off the bottom and cooked as they are.

Might want to sprinkle some salt and pepper. Some chili powder also helps.

Add the green onions towards the end because you don't want this cooked too much.


I like to make my dish look nice.  I don’t always cook for myself and visual is one sense you have that perceives information.  When you see a nicely plated food, you will want to eat it.  It could also trick your other sense thinking it’s pretty tasty.  This was actually tasty though.

7. Now, back to the fish. Take the fish out of the marinade and throw it onto a pan that has been heated in high heat for 3 minutes.  Throwing your fish on a high temperature grill prevents the fish from sticking known as protein stick.  My pan was a non-stick so this doesn’t happen but this cooking method is a great habit to possess for cooking fish because first you may have to one day grill your fish and second high temperature searing seals the juice of any meat and fish.  Then you will turn it down to medium heat after searing both sides and cook for another 3-4 minutes on each side.


8. If you want a saucy dish, you can simply turn your marinade into sauce.  Pour the rest of the marinade  into the pan and heat it up for a couple of minutes.


9. Place your fish over your vegetable garnish and it’s ready to serve.  Bon appetit!


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1 comments:

Janet Ching said...

Thanks Peter for referring. Mahi Mahi is my hubby's favorite's fish, BTW, his name is also Peter. We had some nice mahi mahi in Bahamas when we had our honey moon in May, sometimes if I am lucky I can find it here from a good fish monger. Also I am invited to have BBQ at my neighbour and I am planning to make some Korean BBQ and bring with me for them to try : ) but I will keep them in bigger pieces this time.

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